Topic: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

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I Can’t Breathe and This Is Why

Yvette E. Pearson, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE, is the associate dean for accreditation, assessment and strategic initiatives at Rice University in Houston. She has been an active member of ASCE for two decades, taking on a variety of leadership roles for several sustainability, education and diversity committees and programs. She currently chairs ASCE’s Members of Society Advancing an Inclusive Culture (MOSAIC), and recently launched the...

How ASCE’s Code of Ethics May Apply to Personal Conduct during the Pandemic

This hypothetical situation is modified from an actual case that was considered by ASCE’s Committee on Professional Conduct (CPC). Situation AN ASCE MEMBER maintains a personal Facebook page on which he regularly shares humorous graphics, videos, and popular memes. As evidenced by his postings, the member’s sense of humor runs the gamut from innocent to salacious, with topics ranging from family and home life to current...

ASCE Plot Points Season 3 Episode 5: Representation

When it comes to inspiring the next generation of civil engineers, representation is so very important. Jose Castro, an assistant engineer in water resources for Michael Baker International in Irvine, California, tells his story of both how he was inspired to pursue civil engineering when he was a student and how he now inspires students through outreach work (1:52). In Extracurricular, we hear from Ashlyn Alexander,...

ASCE Plot Points Season 2 Episode 7: Qu-AKE

Guillermo Díaz-Fañas, C.Eng, Ing., P.E., M.ASCE, has been giving back and making a difference all his life. Today he talks about the nonprofit he helped start, Qu-AKE: Queer Advocacy and Knowledge Exchange, for LGBTQ+ professionals working in the built environment (1:16). In the Changing the World segment, Hector Colon de la Cruz discusses his work on ASCE's Infrastructure Report Card for Puerto Rico (12:50). And in Member...

Becoming leaders

Carolyn Emerson talks about the challenges she saw for women in civil engineering more than a decade ago and what progress she has seen since.

Top 5 ASCE Summer Beach Reads

There may be no better place for catching up on some reading than the laid-back down time of a summer vacation at the beach. But what to read? So many choices. So many books. For the second consecutive year, ASCE News has compiled its annual list of beach reads, perfect for the civil engineer whose idea of relaxing in the sun features a heavy dose of interesting,...

Turning Adversity into a Platform for Pride

Guillermo Díaz-Fañas could have stayed quiet. Growing up in the Dominican Republic, Díaz-Fañas, C.Eng, Ing., P.E., M.ASCE, was different in a place where normalcy reigned. He was exceedingly smart. Exceptionally ambitious. And, in perhaps his most significant divergence from community expectations, he was gay. “I remember, I was pointed out always as, ‘Oh, he is a little sissy, he has a lot of mannerisms,’” Díaz-Fañas said. Guillermo...

ASCE Board Takes Big-Picture Approach

The Board of Direction continues to take a big-picture approach to leadership. Last year, that meant developing a new strategic plan for ASCE. At its quarterly meeting in Arlington, VA, March 10, the Board moved from strategy into implementation, highlighted by the approval of a future-focused reorganization of the Society’s Committee on Advancing the Profession. “I’m very excited, because in essence what happened with CAP was...

Balancing act: ASCE women prove motherhood and career isn’t an either-or proposition

“So many women working as civil engineers are now in their 20s and 30s and struggling with that question: can I have this career that I’ve worked my whole life for and also have a family?” said Rose McClure, structural engineer.

The state of women in civil engineering

Who do you picture when you think of a civil engineer? Did you picture a woman in the profession? Studies show that only 14 percent of the civil engineering workforce is composed of women. About 40 percent of women who have engineering degrees never enter the workforce or drop out.