Topic: History and Preservation

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Medieval structure reworked to make acoustics sing

Engineers enlarged a former medieval hospital in Ghent, Belgium, and fine-tuned a host of its site features to improve the acoustic performance of the building as a modern concert hall.

5 things you didn’t know about … the Ward House

Designated as a National Historic Civil and Concrete Engineering Landmark by ASCE and the American Concrete Institute in 1977, the Ward House in Rye Brook, New York, is a landmark that many people have never heard about.

Then and now: NYC rebuilds iconic Fountain of the Fairs as a fog garden

Flushing Meadows Corona Park in the city’s borough of Queens has rebuilt the historical 1964 set of fountains, which will open when the weather warms.

Penn Station expansion creates new ‘grand entrance’ to NYC

New York City’s new Moynihan Train Hall was constructed within a historical post office building, across from Penn Station and directly above many of the station’s platforms and tracks.

US plans to retire ‘survey foot’ length

After almost 60 years of dragging its feet, the U.S. government prepares to retire the historical unit of measure.

The Philadelphia Municipal Water Supply was the first of its kind

Steam engines and wooden pipes helped Philadelphia pioneer large-scale municipal water delivery.

European museum will boast sculptural spiral stairway, observation deck

Work on the FENIX Museum of Migration in Rotterdam, Netherlands, has begun.

Review: On food infrastructure and urban growth

Ray Bert takes a look at Andrew Deener's book, The Problem with Feeding Cities (University of Chicago Press, 2020).

U.S. Army Corps deconstructs nuclear facilities, carefully

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recently decommissioned and dismantled a nuclear power plant onboard a ship — the first of a trio of reactors that must be deconstructed over the next several years.

Perseverance pays off: The Transatlantic Telegraph Cable

The design and positioning of the Transatlantic Telegraph Cable — the internet of its day — was a daring, costly endeavor.